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For those who may be unaware, the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation and vocal opponent of reptiles as pets, stands accused of excessive political lobbying, a violation of 501(c)(3) incorporation rules, which could result in the loss of its tax-exempt status. Several U.S. Congressmen have called for an immediate IRS investigation.

Now it appears that the IRS investigation of the Humane Society of the United States may have been stonewalled by Lois Lerner, an active HSUS member, and also the Director of IRS Exempt Organizations Division.

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Lois Lerner, Director of IRS Exempt Organizations Division

IRS's Lois Lerner, 'active member' of Humane Society, may have delayed investigating group's tax status
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Humane Society of the United States IRS investigation letter

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Humane Society of the United States IRS investigation letter



Lois G. Lerner, the embattled Internal Revenue Service official who apologized for improperly scrutinizing the tax-exempt status of conservative nonprofit groups, is a member of the Humane Society of the United States, a liberal animal advocacy organization.

Lerner -- the suddenly infamous IRS Exempt Organizations Division director -- "is an active member of the Humane Society of the United States where her efforts in performing pet rescues necessitated by the 2005 Gulf Coast hurricanes were widely acknowledged," according to her biography.

The HSUS has been accused of sending less than one percent of its funds to animal shelters, a charge that a spokesman in 2012 would not deny. According to IRS filings, the group took in $148,703,820 in revenue in 2010.

On May 12, 2010, Republican Missouri Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer wrote a letter to Lerner, expressing his concerns about the tax-exempt status of the HSUS, which is listed as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit group.

"The attached information unquestionably demonstrates that [the] HSUS invests a substantial amount of time and money in political campaigns and attempts to influence specific legislation, a clear and direct violation of section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code," Luetkemeyer wrote in the letter.

"I understand that you are not at liberty to comment on any potential IRS actions but do hope your agency will give thoughtful consideration of the concerns I have expressed," Luetkemeyer wrote.

Lerner has been unresponsive to Luetkemeyer's office's repeated requests for status updates on the matter over the past three years.

"This was actually the result of concerns from constituents at the time that [the] HSUS was involved in political activity," Luetkemeyer spokesman Paul Sloca told The Daily Caller Thursday.

"Since then, over the past three years, we've been in contact with Treasury, and with Ms. Lerner, on this issue," Sloca said. "They have told us they can't comment on an ongoing investigation, but they haven't been able to confirm that they've even launched an investigation."

"They won't confirm that there is an investigation going on. They haven't provided any substantive information," he said.

"Considering the current news about the IRS, this is definitely something the congressman is definitely going to follow up on," Sloca concluded.

By the time Luetkemeyer sent his letter to Lerner in May 2010, the IRS had already begun targeting conservative nonprofit groups for extra scrutiny, according to a report released Tuesday night by the Treasury Inspector General.

Lerner did not respond to TheDC's request for comment for this report.

The Humane Society of the United States declined comment.

Source: http://dailycaller.com/2013/05/16/irs-lois-lerner-humane-society/

And on Monday, May 20th:


posted on Sunday May 19, 2013 at 04:31pm by Web@aqua-terra-vita
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The Most Ridiculous Scary Snake Story Ever

The following "news" story was recently published in the U.K. tabloid, "Mail Online." It has to be one of the most ridiculous scary snake stories ever!

Four-foot-long deadly snake named ‘Hissing Sid’ evades police who even scramble a helicopter to look for him

By Rebecca Seales
July 30, 2012

A potentially deadly snake is on the loose after evading a police helicopter which was scrambled to track it down.

Residents are on the lookout for a 4ft-long constrictor which has been spotted slithering along pavements in Plymouth, Devon.

The reptile was briefly captured by three people who trapped it in a bin - but is so strong that it forced its way out and vanished up an elderly lady's drainpipe.

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Scary Snake

Slippery customer: The four-foot-long snake, pictured, has been evading capture for days and was last seen heading up a drainpipe
A police helicopter equipped with thermal imagine gear was diverted to scour the area on Saturday, but the elusive snake - nicknamed 'Hissing Sid' by locals - remains at large.

Therapist Bernard Brotherton, 53, was one of three local residents who captured the creature in a knee-high swing-bin last Thursday, before it slipped from their grasp.

Ironically the dad-of one had been guzzling Snakebite - a cocktail of lager and cider - moments before the drama unfolded.

He said of the escapade: 'It seemed like the sensible thing to do, but it was so strong it would wrap itself around the rim of the lid and squeeze itself through the top like toothpaste.

'We got it in about three times but even with six hands pushing down on the lid it was too powerful.

'It was getting angry so we backed off, and at that point it decided to pop up the drainpipe.'

Vets, environmental health experts, the police, the RSPCA and a local animal centre have all attended the scene over the weekend, but the snake has not been spotted since Saturday.

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Scary Snake Helicopter Pursuit

Unusual measures: Devon and Cornwall Police diverted a helicopter in a failed bid to track the roving reptile down

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Scary Snake Town

Watch your step! 'Hissing Sid' has been spotted slithering along a pavement in Keyham, Plymouth
Mr Brotherton managed to get a picture of the snake on his mobile phone, and experts believe it is a non-native species, probably a constrictor.

Devon and Cornwall Police said PCSOs had carried out house-to-house enquiries in the Keyham area, but that nobody had admitted to being Sid's owner.

Mr Brotherton added: 'If it is a constrictor, like they think it is, it is worrying. There are young children around here and it could do them some harm.

'It could slide under some slates and into somebody's loft or maybe down a chimney.

'Or it could be miles away by now. It probably wants a nice quiet life away from all this publicity.

'It wasn't being aggressive until towards the end of our struggle, but I'd still rather know where it is.'

Devon and Cornwall Police said its force helicopter was diverted to the scene while on its way to another job.

Police have urged people to call them if they spot the runaway reptile.

Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2181187/Plymouth-snake-Four-foot-long-deadly-constrictor-named-Hissing-Sid-evades-police-Devon.html
posted on Saturday August 4, 2012 at 02:01pm by Web@aqua-terra-vita
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Playing the Salmonella Card
by Web Wheeler
July 24, 2012



A short while ago a Toronto grade school teacher was praised in the Toronto Star newspaper for his efforts to educate students about the wonders of reptiles. Here's a link to that Toronto Star article:

http://www.thestar.com/news/education/article/1209081--snakes-lizards-and-geckos-part-of-learning-at-clinton-street-public-school

Less than 24 hours later, an entry on the University of Guelph "Worms and Germs Blog", by Dr. Scott Weese, Associate Professor in the Department of Pathobiology at the University of Guelph and Public Health and Zoonotic Disease microbiologist for the University's Centre for Public Health and Zoonoses, was critical of the Toronto teacher's effort, saying, "The sentiment is great and I applaud the teacher's efforts to engage kids and teach them about animals, However, it's a cost/benefit situation and the potential costs (which may be extreme) outweigh the benefits (significant as they may be). While reptiles can be great pets in certain situations, they're not meant for schools where there are lots of kids, challenges with supervision, difficulty implementing good infection control practices and potentially individuals at high risk for infection."

Here's a link to the "Worms and Germs Blog" entry:

http://www.wormsandgermsblog.com/2012/06/articles/animals/reptiles/elementary-school-reptile-club-good-bad-or-ugly/

I am indeed surprised by this critical blog post by Dr. Weese, and here's why:


Salmonella is ubiquitous in the environment

Salmonella is ubiquitous in the natural environment, and many opportunities exist for cross-contamination during the production, harvest, processing and/or distribution of foodstuffs.(1)

Any raw food of animal origin, such as meat, poultry, milk and dairy products, eggs, seafood, and some fruits and vegetables may carry Salmonella bacteria.(2)


Contaminated food is the major mode of transmission

Contaminated food is the major mode of transmission for non-typhoidal salmonellae because salmonellosis is a zoonosis and has an enormous animal reservoir. The most common animal reservoirs are chickens, turkeys, pigs, and cows; dozens of other domestic and wild animals also harbor these organisms. Because of the ability of salmonellae to survive in meats and animal products that are not thoroughly cooked, animal products are the main vehicle of transmission. The magnitude of the problem is demonstrated by the following recent yields of salmonellae: 41% of turkeys examined in California, 50% of chickens cultured in Massachusetts, and 21% of commercial frozen egg whites examined in Spokane, WA.(3)

Every year hundreds of thousands of people are infected with food-borne Salmonella poisoning.(3)(4)


Traditional pets can also transmit Salmonella

Salmonella infections in dogs and cats deserve special comment for several reasons related to zoonotic transmission:
1. Salmonella spp. can be isolated from healthy dogs and cats at rates of up to 36% and 18%, respectively.
2. Dogs and cats tend to shed Salmonella organisms for very prolonged periods of time after infection.
3. Dogs and especially cats can shed Salmonella organisms in both their feces and saliva, meaning that transmission can occur via licking.
4. Pig ear dog treats may be a source of Salmonella infection for both dogs and humans that handle the treats.
5. Dogs and cats may suffer salmonellosis as a "reverse zoonosis," with infection transmitted from human-to-dog and subsequently back to other humans.
6. Similarly, outbreaks of Salmonella infections in large animal teaching hospitals have been linked to the introduction of bacteria from infected human personnel, with subsequent spread to animals and then back to other human workers.
(5)

Dogs and cats can become ill due to a Salmonella infection and have diarrhea, fever, vomiting, decreased appetite, or abdominal pain; however, some dogs and cats may be asymptomatic. Like humans, some dogs and cats can become carriers and can infect other animals or humans.(6)

Dog food contaminated with Salmonella has [recently] sickened at least 22 people throughout the United States and two people in Canada, according to the latest update from the Centers for Disease Control an Prevention (CDC).(4)


Most cases of Salmonella poisoning do not require treatment

Most persons infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after infection. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most persons recover without treatment.(6)

At least 40,000 salmonella infections are reported every year, but experts believe that between 400,000 and 4 million persons each year actually contract salmonellosis.(3)

Salmonella infections can be life-threatening for the very young, the very old and for persons already weakened by other serious diseases, such as AIDS. Reports show about 2 deaths for every 1,000 known cases of salmonellosis, but experts believe that about 500 persons each year actually die from salmonella infections.(3)

Author's Note: experts believe that about 500 persons each year actually die from salmonella infections out of the 400,000 to 4 million persons who contract salmonellosis every year.


Basic hygiene can help prevent Salmonella poisoning

Wash your hands thoroughly after contact with animal feces, pets, pet turtles, pet rodents, pet food, pet toys and pet treats.(7)


Is Dr. Weese overstating the risks of Salmonella poisoning from reptiles?

As a professional exotic animal breeder, as a researcher, as a citizen scientist, as a reptile and tropical fish enthusiast for over 40 years, I believe, in the case of the Toronto teacher, Jim Karkavitsas, who manages the Clinton Street public school reptile club, the answer is yes. The concerns which Dr. Weese raises, while valid, are all either expertly addressed by Mr. Karkavitsas or are not applicable to this situation.

Dr. Weese states "Salmonella. That's the big one. Reptiles are classic sources of Salmonella. You can almost guarantee that more than one of these reptiles are shedding the bacterium. If a reptile is shedding Salmonella in its feces, it will also likely have the bacterium on its skin, in its cage and in any areas where it roams. It also means that anyone touching it (or its environment, or contaminated areas) can pick up Salmonella on their hands, with subsequent transfer into the mouth. This is a high-risk situation since reptiles are a major source of salmonellosis, especially in kids. Reptile-associated salmonellosis does occur in classroooms."

Mr. Karkavitsas states "Kids use hand sanitizer before and after handling the animals."(8)

Dr. Weese's second concern is "Mr. Karkavitsas buys frozen rats to feed the snakes. Frozen rats can also be contaminated with Salmonella, and frozen rats have caused salmonellosis in kids in a school (which was also brought home and spread other family members). There's also been a large (and likely ongoing) international salmonellosis outbreak associated with frozen rodents."

The large (and likely ongoing) international salmonellosis outbreak associated with frozen rodents is limited to one rodent supplier in the U.S.(9) and is very unlikely to be applicable to this situation, as Mr. Karkavitsas gets all of his rodents from a local Toronto pet shop.(8)

The last concern Dr. Weese stated is "Standard recommendations are that children less than five years of age (along with pregnant women, elderly individuals and people with compromised immune systems) not have contact with reptiles. This is a grade 5-6 classroom, so the students would be older than this, but I wouldn't be surprised if younger kids in the school also have contact with the reptiles. Additionally, the immunocompromised group is an issue, since many people have compromised immune systems due to various diseases or treatments. Teachers may not know about all of these and parents may not realize that their high-risk child is having contact with high-risk animals in school. When you can't be sure that high-risk people won't have direct or indirect contact, that's a problem."

While the Clinton Street public school is for Kindergarten to Grade 6 students, there is no indication that kids under the age of five, or other high-risk individuals, are involved with this club.(8)


Some final thoughts

Allowing kids to have fun, to learn about the natural world, to have respect for animals, to overcome phobias and disruptive behaviors, to practice good hygiene and to aspire to become scientists(8) are all excellent traits that should be fostered both at school and in the home.

Yes, there are risks, but I strongly disagree with Dr. Weese's assessment "The sentiment is great and I applaud the teacher's efforts to engage kids and teach them about animals, However, it's a cost/benefit situation and the potential costs (which may be extreme) outweigh the benefits (significant as they may be). While reptiles can be great pets in certain situations, they're not meant for schools where there are lots of kids, challenges with supervision, difficulty implementing good infection control practices and potentially individuals at high risk for infection."

Kids risk contracting salmonellosis just by going to school, by eating in the school cafeteria, by using the school's washrooms, by playing with other kids at school and by the myriad of other school activities they engage in every day.

Rather than condemning the practice of hands-on-learning via a public school reptile club, Dr. Weese should instead be working closely with Mr. Karkavitsas and other school officials to ensure that his concerns are fully addressed and that kids are getting all the benefits that a public school reptile club has to offer.


References

(1)Salmonella Laboratory, Health Canada http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/sr-sr/activ/micro/salmon-eng.php

(2) U.S. Department of Agriculture http://www.fsis.usda.gov/factsheets/salmonella_questions_&_answers/

(3) bionewsonline.com http://www.bionewsonline.com/h/what_is_salmonella.htm

(4) Food Poisoning Law Blog http://foodpoisoning.pritzkerlaw.com/archives/cat-salmonella.html

(5) School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin http://www.vetmed.wisc.edu/pbs/zoonoses/gik9fel/salmonella.html

(6) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) http://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/general/index.html

(7) Canadian Food Inspection Agency http://www.inspection.gc.ca/food/consumer-centre/food-safety-tips/causes-of-food-borne-illness/salmonella/eng/1332781237334/1332781591310

(8) Toronto Star http://www.thestar.com/news/education/article/1209081--snakes-lizards-and-geckos-part-of-learning-at-clinton-street-public-school

(9) Worms and Germs Blog http://www.wormsandgermsblog.com/2012/04/articles/animals/pocket-pets/the-outbreak-that-wont-go-away/
posted on Tuesday July 24, 2012 at 11:59am by Web@aqua-terra-vita
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"Looking Through the Glass" is my critical examination of the world of exotic animal ownership.
posted on Thursday December 30, 2010 at 12:30pm by Web@aqua-terra-vita
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